Spanish islands of pleasure and delight: The Balearics have something for everyone – The Sunday Post

WITH their turquoise waters and white, sandy beaches, the Balearics have always been a firm holiday favourite.

Bookings have gone up sharply in recent times, despite the pound’s woes against the euro.

The four main islands on sunny Spain’s shores are the picture-perfect destination for a relaxing break with their sun-kissed beaches.

Each boasts unique highlights, from the world-famous glamorous clubs of Ibiza to the secret beaches on Menorca, the cosmopolitan feel of Majorca, or the quietness of lesser-known

Formentera.

Here’s our look at the best of the Balearics.

Majorca

The beauty of this island was shown on our screens as the filming location for BBC drama, The Night Manager.

From beautiful beaches to superb shopping, whether you like an active holiday or simply soaking up the sun, there’s plenty to do here.

With more than 300 miles of coastline, there something like 200 beaches to choose from. The most stunning of the sun-kissed sands can be found at Playa de Alcudia and Calla Millor.

However, if it’s something more secluded you’re after, there are plenty of hidden gems, from Alcudia’s Playa de Muro to the gorgeous Cala Varques in Manacor, accessed by a footpath through the woods.

For shopping and culture, the cosmopolitan capital, Palma, is where you want to be.

From the 13th Century church Iglesia de Santa Eulalia to the cobbled lanes and the Gothic cathedral in the old quarter, to the ancient passages, historic monuments and magnificent architecture, there are no shortage of things to see.

Sporty types will love the sleepy town of Valldemossa. Surrounded by the forest-covered hills of the Tramuntana range, it’s the perfect spot for hiking.

And Es Ponta is well-noted for its rock climbing spots.

If you fancy spotting a celeb or two, head to the pretty town of Port de Soller. Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich’s yacht is just one that’s been seen moored just off the coast.

The chic marina of Puerto Portals is a favourite destination of the Spanish royal family and filled with luxury yachts, expensive boutiques and flashy cars.

It feels like a smaller version of Monte Carlo in Monaco.


Tourists relaxing on Plaza Alfonzo III, at Ciutadella, on the island of Menorca, Spain (iStock)

Menorca

Majorca’s sister island is a sleepy alternative.

Think sun-drenched beaches, cobalt blue inlets, and interiors filled with fields and rolling hills.

Menorca’s beaches are really impressive. There’s everything from long, golden sands and pine-backed bays to off the beaten track coves.

For the longest stretch of sands, head for family favourite, Son Bou.

Visit the lively capital of Mahon for a dose of culture.

Mahon used to be ruled by the Brits, and you’ll get a real sense of its colonial past along Carrer Isabel ll, with its balconied townhouses complete with sash windows.

There’s more 18th-Century history at the Xoriguer gin distillery down by the harbour.

It’s altogether more Gothic at the cathedral, though, where the organ recitals come courtesy of 3000 pipes.

And take in the picturesque port of Ciutadella. With its cobbled streets clustered around a smart, yacht-filled harbour, it was the island’s capital until the early 18th Century.

The city’s 13th-Century cathedral is a must-see – built on the site of an old mosque, it has a neo-classic facade and a huge, marble altar.

The island’s gentle landscapes are ideal for activities such as walking, cycling or riding – with no scary sharp inclines for those who aren’t super fit.


The mysterious island of Es Vedra. Ibiza, Balearic Islands. Spain (iStock)

Ibiza

Ibiza is infamous for being the Balearic’s party island and is known for its wild clubs and bars.

But if dancing the night away isn’t your thing, you’ll soon discover there’s more to Ibiza than meets the eye.

The capital Ibiza Town has an old quarter that’s earned itself a place on UNESCO’s World Heritage Site list. It’s cocooned by medieval stone walls and overlooked by a fortress.

Resorts such as Cas Mallorqui, Port de Sant Miquel, and Cala de Sant Vicent are more low-key.

Portinatx is arguably the most beautiful and secluded part of the island.

Three sandy beaches meet a shallow, turquoise sea, the perfect spot for families looking for a chilled-out escape.

Small sailing boats bob in the distance and the forested bay that wraps around this tranquil resort make it feel all the more peaceful.

For shopping, Es Cana is the home of the original hippy market of Punta Arabi, which has been running since the ’70s. The weekly event is packed with stalls selling crafts, clothes, traditional Ibizan souvenirs and homemade seafood paella, hot out of the pan.

Aside from that you’ll find plenty of hippy vibes, yoga retreats, and lovely boutique hotels out of the party zone.

Formentera

The tiny island of Formentera lies less than four miles south of Ibiza, but couldn’t be further away in terms of atmosphere and character.

Just 12 miles across, it can be easily explored on a short trip or even a day-trip from Ibiza itself.

With its chilled-out bohemian vibe, it’s known for its white powdery beaches and shimmering waters.

Most have Blue Flag status, including the five-mile stretch at Migjorn.

Even the capital has a go-slow as its default setting. San Francisco is built around an unhurried central square, where notice boards advertise massages and yoga classes.

Two of the island’s most famous sights are its lighthouses – La Mola, which was written about by Jules Verne – and Es Cap de Barbaria, which featured in the well known Spanish movie, Lucia y el Sexo.

History buffs will love Ca Na Costa, Formentera’s answer to Stonehenge. It’s nowhere near as big, but almost as old.

Dating back to 2000BC, this stone circle, on the outskirts of Es Pujols, is thought to have been built by the island’s first inhabitants.

The ruins were discovered in 1974 and, along with the rock structures, weapons and skeletons were found among the remains.

Those who love the water can take the opportunity to try snorkelling and scuba diving, which are popular pursuits here, and in all of the Balearics.

The World’s First Sand Hostel Opens on Australia’s Gold Coast – Architectural Digest

What makes Australia’s Gold Coast most famous, perhaps, are the beautiful beaches and world-class surfers. Starting today, the famed stretch of land along Australia’s east coast will have another moniker to add to its title: the world’s first-ever hostel built of sand. For three days, from September 19–21, travelers looking to add yet another memorable experience while visiting the land Down Under can book a room at the Sand Hostel. Commissioned as a joint project by Hostelworld and Gold Coast Tourism, the structure was designed by Jon Dowding, the production designer for such feature films as Mad Max: Fury Road. The structure was built by renowned sand sculptor Dennis Massoud. Referred to as the Sandman, Massoud first gained notoriety for winning the world championship of sand sculpting at a 2003 event in Denmark. He subsequently was commissioned to build his sand sculptures in the only eight-star hotel in the world, the Emirates Palace Hotel in Abu Dhabi.

Located on Kurrawa Beach, Sand Hostel can accommodate adventurous guests in either an eight-bed dorm or a luxury private suite. The structure, which took 21 days to complete, required some 53,000 pounds of sand to build. While Sand Hostel is comprised almost entirely of sand, the structure does include ceilings made of rafters and woven bamboo paneling to ensure structural stability.

A look at one of the private rooms for guests to stay in.

And for those guests who don’t mind sleeping in a room built of sand, but prefer not to spend the entire day in it, Sand Hostel has created a curated list of activities for the three days it’s open. Beach yoga, surfing lessons, and cocktail-making classes are but a few of the events guests can attend. (Unfortunately, sandcastle building is not one of them.)

The idea for Sand Hostel was born from a simple Facebook post: Hostelworld asked its Facebook community what its dream hostel would be. An overwhelming majority voted for a sand hostel. Now the question that has to be asked is, what’s next?

Movie Review: ‘American Assassin’ – Georgetown University The Hoya


CBS FILMS

★★★☆☆

American Assassin is an origin story, and it starts as such at the very beginning. Like many beginnings, it sets a happy scene: Mitch Rapp, played by Dylan O’Brien, romps on the beaches of Ibiza, Spain with his girlfriend — and soon after, fiancee — Katrina, played by Charlotte Vega. Their engagement is short-lived, however. Just moments into the film, Katrina is shot and killed, one victim of many in a brutal terrorist attack.

The attack is swift and shocking — the violence is jarring, in particular, given the dream-like beach setting. It leaves a lasting impression, but it is somehow lacking. Perhaps it was too quick, too senseless, too cliché. Still, it serves its purpose: It sets the mood for the rest of the film and is Rapp’s driving force.

Eighteen months later, we meet the new Rapp: a grizzly version of his former self, fluent in Arabic and a master of martial arts. O’Brien, a favorite of “Teen Wolf” fans and star of the “Maze Runner” film trilogy, pulls off the transition well. Rapp has tracked down and infiltrated the terrorist cell responsible for the erstwhile attack, and his skills have caught the eye of CIA Deputy Director Irene Kennedy, played by Sanna Lathan. Instead of sending him to jail for his illegal activities or perhaps therapy for his seemingly disturbed psyche, she decides to send him to Stan Hurley, a former Navy SEAL played by Michael Keaton, to teach Rapp how to kill better.

Kennedy is introduced as a central part of Rapp’s new identity as a CIA operative, telling Rapp in a stern, almost motherly tone that she “has faith in [him].” What could have been an intriguing relationship, however, is lost as the story continues: She spends the rest of the film marching around a CIA command center, putting undeserved trust in an agent with no regard for commands. Kennedy’s character is representative of the film’s biggest flaw: A plot device that is scarily effective at moving the story forward, but at times unrealistic and too predictable.

The real star of the film, aside from Rapp himself, is Stan Hurley. Keaton plays Hurley exceptionally well, injecting a much-needed dose of humor into the otherwise somber story. He delivers memorable one-liners that serve as opportunities to laugh at the at-times-ludicrous plot developments.

Most of all, Keaton plays the role outstandingly well alongside O’Brien. He does exactly what a supporting character is meant to do: Contribute meaningfully to the main character’s development while still standing as his own character.

Alongside Keaton’s compelling delivery of Hurley, O’Brien delivers his own engaging performance as star of the film, even when the script limits him to surly expressions and dark conversations about his desire to kill people who “deserve it.” He is charismatic and sexy but is also still the tortured, broken shell of a man who has lost too much to tragedy. O’Brien is also a treat in well-choreographed hand-to-hand combat scenes.

No spy flick is complete without a stunning foreign spy, who comes in the form of Annika, a Turkish agent played by Shiva Negar. Although the stunning foreign spy archetype usually brings to the film a sense of tension and mystery, Annika’s relationship with Rapp is not developed well enough to warrant the screen time it receives.

The team — Rapp, Hurley, Annika and Kennedy — race to stop a dangerous terrorist plot, and the rest of the film plays out like any other superspy story: A hero on a personal mission, a villain with a grudge, friction between teacher and student, betrayal and redemption and, at the center of it all, a top secret mission with global implications.

“American Assassin” is a cliche film, but so are most spy thrillers. To avoid that label, the film needed either to lighten up and embrace its moments of comedy or go even deeper in its exploration of Rapp’s mental state — as it is, it is too serious to be funny but too funny to be serious.

Still, the film has its merits. It is a thriller through and through, jam-packed with impressive fight scenes, and on occasion, scenes of much-needed comedy. O’Brien and Keaton deliver stellar performances, bringing depth to a simplistic plotline and helping audiences connect more deeply with the story of the “American Assassin.”

Have a reaction to this article? Write a letter to the editor.




Movie Review: ‘American Assassin’ – Georgetown University The Hoya


CBS FILMS

★★★☆☆

American Assassin is an origin story, and it starts as such at the very beginning. Like many beginnings, it sets a happy scene: Mitch Rapp, played by Dylan O’Brien, romps on the beaches of Ibiza, Spain with his girlfriend — and soon after, fiancee — Katrina, played by Charlotte Vega. Their engagement is short-lived, however. Just moments into the film, Katrina is shot and killed, one victim of many in a brutal terrorist attack.

The attack is swift and shocking — the violence is jarring, in particular, given the dream-like beach setting. It leaves a lasting impression, but it is somehow lacking. Perhaps it was too quick, too senseless, too cliché. Still, it serves its purpose: It sets the mood for the rest of the film and is Rapp’s driving force.

Eighteen months later, we meet the new Rapp: a grizzly version of his former self, fluent in Arabic and a master of martial arts. O’Brien, a favorite of “Teen Wolf” fans and star of the “Maze Runner” film trilogy, pulls off the transition well. Rapp has tracked down and infiltrated the terrorist cell responsible for the erstwhile attack, and his skills have caught the eye of CIA Deputy Director Irene Kennedy, played by Sanna Lathan. Instead of sending him to jail for his illegal activities or perhaps therapy for his seemingly disturbed psyche, she decides to send him to Stan Hurley, a former Navy SEAL played by Michael Keaton, to teach Rapp how to kill better.

Kennedy is introduced as a central part of Rapp’s new identity as a CIA operative, telling Rapp in a stern, almost motherly tone that she “has faith in [him].” What could have been an intriguing relationship, however, is lost as the story continues: She spends the rest of the film marching around a CIA command center, putting undeserved trust in an agent with no regard for commands. Kennedy’s character is representative of the film’s biggest flaw: A plot device that is scarily effective at moving the story forward, but at times unrealistic and too predictable.

The real star of the film, aside from Rapp himself, is Stan Hurley. Keaton plays Hurley exceptionally well, injecting a much-needed dose of humor into the otherwise somber story. He delivers memorable one-liners that serve as opportunities to laugh at the at-times-ludicrous plot developments.

Most of all, Keaton plays the role outstandingly well alongside O’Brien. He does exactly what a supporting character is meant to do: Contribute meaningfully to the main character’s development while still standing as his own character.

Alongside Keaton’s compelling delivery of Hurley, O’Brien delivers his own engaging performance as star of the film, even when the script limits him to surly expressions and dark conversations about his desire to kill people who “deserve it.” He is charismatic and sexy but is also still the tortured, broken shell of a man who has lost too much to tragedy. O’Brien is also a treat in well-choreographed hand-to-hand combat scenes.

No spy flick is complete without a stunning foreign spy, who comes in the form of Annika, a Turkish agent played by Shiva Negar. Although the stunning foreign spy archetype usually brings to the film a sense of tension and mystery, Annika’s relationship with Rapp is not developed well enough to warrant the screen time it receives.

The team — Rapp, Hurley, Annika and Kennedy — race to stop a dangerous terrorist plot, and the rest of the film plays out like any other superspy story: A hero on a personal mission, a villain with a grudge, friction between teacher and student, betrayal and redemption and, at the center of it all, a top secret mission with global implications.

“American Assassin” is a cliche film, but so are most spy thrillers. To avoid that label, the film needed either to lighten up and embrace its moments of comedy or go even deeper in its exploration of Rapp’s mental state — as it is, it is too serious to be funny but too funny to be serious.

Still, the film has its merits. It is a thriller through and through, jam-packed with impressive fight scenes, and on occasion, scenes of much-needed comedy. O’Brien and Keaton deliver stellar performances, bringing depth to a simplistic plotline and helping audiences connect more deeply with the story of the “American Assassin.”

Have a reaction to this article? Write a letter to the editor.




Movie Review: ‘American Assassin’ – Georgetown University The Hoya


CBS FILMS

★★★☆☆

American Assassin is an origin story, and it starts as such at the very beginning. Like many beginnings, it sets a happy scene: Mitch Rapp, played by Dylan O’Brien, romps on the beaches of Ibiza, Spain with his girlfriend — and soon after, fiancee — Katrina, played by Charlotte Vega. Their engagement is short-lived, however. Just moments into the film, Katrina is shot and killed, one victim of many in a brutal terrorist attack.

The attack is swift and shocking — the violence is jarring, in particular, given the dream-like beach setting. It leaves a lasting impression, but it is somehow lacking. Perhaps it was too quick, too senseless, too cliché. Still, it serves its purpose: It sets the mood for the rest of the film and is Rapp’s driving force.

Eighteen months later, we meet the new Rapp: a grizzly version of his former self, fluent in Arabic and a master of martial arts. O’Brien, a favorite of “Teen Wolf” fans and star of the “Maze Runner” film trilogy, pulls off the transition well. Rapp has tracked down and infiltrated the terrorist cell responsible for the erstwhile attack, and his skills have caught the eye of CIA Deputy Director Irene Kennedy, played by Sanna Lathan. Instead of sending him to jail for his illegal activities or perhaps therapy for his seemingly disturbed psyche, she decides to send him to Stan Hurley, a former Navy SEAL played by Michael Keaton, to teach Rapp how to kill better.

Kennedy is introduced as a central part of Rapp’s new identity as a CIA operative, telling Rapp in a stern, almost motherly tone that she “has faith in [him].” What could have been an intriguing relationship, however, is lost as the story continues: She spends the rest of the film marching around a CIA command center, putting undeserved trust in an agent with no regard for commands. Kennedy’s character is representative of the film’s biggest flaw: A plot device that is scarily effective at moving the story forward, but at times unrealistic and too predictable.

The real star of the film, aside from Rapp himself, is Stan Hurley. Keaton plays Hurley exceptionally well, injecting a much-needed dose of humor into the otherwise somber story. He delivers memorable one-liners that serve as opportunities to laugh at the at-times-ludicrous plot developments.

Most of all, Keaton plays the role outstandingly well alongside O’Brien. He does exactly what a supporting character is meant to do: Contribute meaningfully to the main character’s development while still standing as his own character.

Alongside Keaton’s compelling delivery of Hurley, O’Brien delivers his own engaging performance as star of the film, even when the script limits him to surly expressions and dark conversations about his desire to kill people who “deserve it.” He is charismatic and sexy but is also still the tortured, broken shell of a man who has lost too much to tragedy. O’Brien is also a treat in well-choreographed hand-to-hand combat scenes.

No spy flick is complete without a stunning foreign spy, who comes in the form of Annika, a Turkish agent played by Shiva Negar. Although the stunning foreign spy archetype usually brings to the film a sense of tension and mystery, Annika’s relationship with Rapp is not developed well enough to warrant the screen time it receives.

The team — Rapp, Hurley, Annika and Kennedy — race to stop a dangerous terrorist plot, and the rest of the film plays out like any other superspy story: A hero on a personal mission, a villain with a grudge, friction between teacher and student, betrayal and redemption and, at the center of it all, a top secret mission with global implications.

“American Assassin” is a cliche film, but so are most spy thrillers. To avoid that label, the film needed either to lighten up and embrace its moments of comedy or go even deeper in its exploration of Rapp’s mental state — as it is, it is too serious to be funny but too funny to be serious.

Still, the film has its merits. It is a thriller through and through, jam-packed with impressive fight scenes, and on occasion, scenes of much-needed comedy. O’Brien and Keaton deliver stellar performances, bringing depth to a simplistic plotline and helping audiences connect more deeply with the story of the “American Assassin.”

Have a reaction to this article? Write a letter to the editor.




In Focus: Ibiza, Spain – Hospitality Net

In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

Accessibility

In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

By AirIbiza Airport is the eighth-busiest airport in Spain in terms of passenger arrivals. The airport is seven kilometres from the centre of Ibiza Town, on the southwest tip of the island. The airport opened in 1958 during the great tourism boom in the Balearic Islands. Nowadays, visitors to Ibiza arrive primarily by plane (95% of total arrivals). Some of the airline companies that fly to and from the airport are the following: AirBerlin, AirEuropa, Air Nostrum, BA CityFlyer, British Airways, easyjet, Edelweiss, Eurowings, Evelop, Germania, Germanwings, Iberia, Jet2.com, KLM, Lufthansa, Norwegian Air Shuttle, Ryanair, Skywork Airlines AG, Swifair, SunExpress, Thomas Cook Airlines, Thomson Airways, Transavia.com, Vueling.

By Sea

The three main ports are the ports of Ibiza, Santa Eulalia and Sant Antoni. The ferry companies -Balearia, Iscomar and Acciona- sail to the ports of Ibiza and Sant Antoni from different places on mainland Spain. Apart from the ferry crossings, it is also possible to reach the island by private ship, chartered crossings and various cruises. The regular sea crossings reach the island of Ibiza from Barcelona, Valencia, Dénia and Palma de Mallorca.

    Main Regions and Attractions

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    Ibiza old town, the capital of Ibiza island with its walled area (Dalt Vila) declared UNESCO World Heritage Site, located on the south of the city, in the municipality of Ibiza. It is known as the place where the posh night life scene evolves with a plethora of hotels, restaurants and bars bursting around the city featuring the latest trends of the hospitality or food and beverage industry. The city houses the main institutions of Ibiza and offers variety of services for the visitors and residents such as yachting marinas, business zones and hospitals. Some points of interests within area are: Ibiza Old Town, the Necropolis of Puig des Molins, Ibiza City Center, the Port of Ibiza and La Marina district and the Yaching Marina.

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    San Antonio Bay, also known as Sant Antoni de Portmany, is located on the centre west coast of Ibiza. It is the second largest town of the island by means of population and chief leisure entertainment centre targeting the budget traveller and the young holiday makers who is looking for affordable solutions when visiting the island. San Antonio is also famous with its famous Sunset at Ses Variades (Sunset Strip), the villages of Santa Agnes de Corona and Sant Mateu d’Aubarca, Ses Torres d’en Luc Archaeological Site and Cala d’Aubarca Cove, Aquarium Cap Blanc, the churches of San Antonio, the village of Sant Rafael de Sa Creu, Cueva de Ses Fontanelles Cave, the Egg of Colombus.

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    Santa Eulalia, also known as Santa Eulària des Riu is located on the centre east coast of the island and has a long-established reputation as the island’s gastronomic and cultural centre. The city boasts several art galleries, some of the island’s best restaurants, a picturesque yacht marina but it is widely known for its palm-lined promenade running the length of the broad and sandy beach. This area is considered as one of the quieter and at the same time sophisticated destinations for laid-back holidays away from the party congestion observed in the previously mentioned areas. Es Puig de Missa is the popular sight of Santa Eulalia located on the hill crowned by a church dating back to 16th century. The charming villages of Sant Carles de Peralta, Santa Gertrudis de Fruitera and Jesus, the Markets of Santa Eulalia (Las Dalias and Punta Arabi), Ethnology Museum of Ibiza and Barrau Museum are the other popular attractions and sights.

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    Sant Joan, also known as Sant Joan de Labritja is the most rural part of Ibiza located on the northern part of the island. The municipality hosts the lowest number of inhabitants and offers the wildest natural landscapes, great flora and fauna and with spectacular cliffs that have been declared as a Natural Area of Special Interest. The Settlement of Balafia and Cova de Can Marça Cave some of the attractions in the area.

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    Sant Josep, also known as Sant Josep de Sa Talaia is located on the south west of Ibiza. It is the administrative town and the largest municipality of the island. The municipality of Sant Josep de Sa Talaia is the most extensive on the Ibiza island and the one that boasts the greatest number of beaches within its 80 kilometers of coastline. The town is established under the highest mountain of the island. Sant Josep shares the Playa d’en Bossa beach with the municipality of Eivissa and Sant Antoni’s Bay on the west. Playa D’en Bossa is known as the place where some of the most prominent resorts of the island are located. These hotels allocate large resources to the entertainment division by developing designated spaces for this activity within the properties and converting the hotel to a multifunctional space and ultimately a destination by itself.

    Demand for Transient Accommodation

    Ibiza’s Airport has a very high flight frequency in the summer months and a low frequency in the low season, as a result of the market’s strong seasonality. According to the Airports Council International 2013 report, Ibiza Airport has one of the highest seasonality ratios in the world. Nevertheless, it seems that this trend is changing as more low-cost carriers launch new routes with higher flight frequencies per week for a number of destinations. During the last 11 years, there has been a remarkable growth in international arrivals while domestic arrivals also grew in a more moderate pace. More specifically during the examined period, international and domestic arrivals have recorded a CAGR by 6.4% and 5.3% respectively. It is worth mentioning that only during the last year international arrivals in the island grew by almost 20% showing the potential of the island. As at the end of March 2017, three new routes were added: Sevilla, Edinburgh and Rome- Fiumicino. The routes will be operated during the summer schedule.

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    Ibiza International Airport

    Basic Visitation Factors

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    Total visitation to Ibiza and Formentera increased significantly from 2011 to 2016, reaching three million arrivals in 2016. This increase was primarily driven by international demand, which accounted for 78.5% of total arrivals in 2016 while domestic visitation has remained relatively stable during this period with a slight decreasing trend. Pre-bookings for 2017 show that this growth in arrivals is expected to continue the following year. Overall, statistics show that nearly 97% of all visitors are travelling to Ibiza for leisure and holiday purposes, a trend which has been consistent over recent years.

    Ibiza and Formentera are served by the same airport, therefore arrivals in all types of accommodation refer to both destinations. With a population of just over 7,000 and no airport, Formentera is usually quieter than its neighbor Ibiza. The island of Formentera can be reached by regular feries from the Estacion Maritima in Ibiza Town but also by tourist ferries from other parts of Ibiza during high season. Formentera has a total of 17 hotels,with 2,404 beds, 12 out of which are classified as one, two and three star properties, five are classified as four-star hotels while the island does not feature any five-star properties.

    The breakdown of arrivals depending on the type of accommodation is depicted in Figure 3. The CAGR for the period 2011-16 was 4.8%, driven both by the increase in arrivals in hotels and similar establishments but also by the rise of sharing economy as an accommodation choice and the subsequent increase in the number of travellers choosing to stay in rented apartments.

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    Main Source Countries

    Ibiza had always been a popular destination among British and 2016 has been a record-breaking year for arrivals from the UK with almost 840,000 British, 12% up from 2015, visiting the region representing 27.7% of total. For the domestic market, Ibiza is a traditional summer destination and is well connected by plane and boat, thus it is the second most important feeder market to the island. Given the country’s post-crisis economic growth, Spanish people have witnessed an increase in the domestic income giving them the opportunity to travel again to to expensive destinations like Ibiza. For 2016 Spanish tourists represented almost 22% of total visitation followed by Italians with 13% and Germany with almost 11%.

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    Seasonality

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    The seasonality in Ibiza is very pronounced with the peak season being in the summer months as the island is mainly a sun and beach destination. Figure 5 depicts the seasonality pattern of the island for the last four years based on monthly arrivals in all types of accommodation. Minor changes have been recorded to the visitation pattern of the island during this period putting a strain on the hotel industry which mainly operates from April to October. Local or regional authorities and private enterprises are trying to alter this situation by undertaking a series of measures to lengthen the tourism season like the increase of number of direct flights towards various destinations during the shoulder months, the strongest positioning of Ibiza in various niche markets (wellness, mice, adventure) by targeting sophisticated travellers seeking for differentiated experiences or the opening to new markerts that do not travel exclusively during the summer peak season and are attracted to alternative forms of tourism that could be developed off season.

    Hotel Supply

    Figure 6 summarises hotel supply in Ibiza over the past eight years. The table below accounts for star-rated hotels only and thus excludes other types of accommodation, such as aparthotels, hotel residences, camping facilities and pensions.

    The majority of hotel units are of one-star, two-star or three-star classification; however, five- and four-star hotel units together constitute the ones with a significantly considerable number of available rooms and beds. During the examined period , development of five-star and four-star units has recorded significant growth demonstrating the evolution of the island to a high-end destination . In general, five-star hotel rooms and beds in Ibiza have almost doubled in number during the period of 2009-16 revealing the intensive investment interest in the region by hoteliers and investors. In 2016 the average room number of a five-star hotel was 231 while average bed number was 457. Both numbers are significantly higher than the average hotel size in 2009 (63 and 126, respectively).

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    Branded Properties

    Despite the fact that Ibiza is considered as one of the most upscale leisure destinations within Europe, almost none international high-end brand has presence in the market. The majority of hotel properties in the island, are currently operated by Spanish companies using local brands with some of the most prominent being the following:

    Palladium Hotel Group is a multinational corporation established over forty years ago with the aim of promoting the island of Ibiza in Spain and across Europe. Over the years it has cemented a position as one of the best-known Spanish companies worldwide. In Ibiza they currently operate 11 properties in various locations around the island under the following brands; five under the Palladium Hotels brand featuring four-star and five-star properties dedicated to family or couple holidays with all-inclusive options; four under the Fiesta Hotel and Resorts brand featuring three-star beach hotels and resorts on the sea front targeting families and couples; one under the Ushuaia Beach Hotel brand, a five-star luxurious music-themed resort targeting young, sophisticated clubbers and one under the Hard Rock Hotel brand, a five-star property which is the first Hard Rock Hotel in Europe and franchise of the Hard Rock International Brand, operated by Palladium Hotel Group. Hard Rock Hotel with 485 rooms and Ushuaia Beach Hotel with 417 rooms, both located in Playa d’en Bossa, were former three-star properties which following extensive remodelling and refurbishment were converted to five-star resorts and since then are considered to be among the leaders of hospitality in the island in terms of innovative design, music events, operational performance and high-end services.

    Meliá Hotels International is a local hotel company with significant international presence. It is largest hotel chain in Spain in both resort and city hotels. The company currently operates more than 370 hotels in 43 countries and 4 continents under its brands: Meliá, Gran Meliá, ME by Meliá, Paradisus, Innside by Meliá, TRYP by Wyndham, Sol Hotels and Club Meliá. The company features three hotels in Ibiza; two four-star properties under the Sol Hotels brand totalling 514 rooms and one five-star under the ME by Meliá brand totalling 205 rooms.

    Insotel Hotel Group, currently has nine hotel complexes with prime beach front locations on the islands of Mallorca, Menorca, Ibiza and Formentera (Balearics, Spain). In Ibiza they operate three properties; two five star properties totalling 568 rooms and one four-star property featuring 172 rooms.

    Pacha Group, the Ibiza-based company behind the world-famous nightclub franchise which has been recently sold to venture capital firm Trilantic Capital Partners for €350 million and is considered to be the pioneer of entertainment in Ibiza operates two properties in the island; the four-star hotel El Pacha with 55 rooms and the four-starDestino Pacha Ibiza Resort with 164 rooms.

    Hotel Montesol in Ibiza town was the first hotel in Spain opened under the ‘Curio’ brand by the Hilton Group, the only international brand with presence in the island. It opened in 2016 the ‘Gran Hotel Montesol Ibiza’ and has 33 rooms while it is one of the few properties in the island open all year round.

    Following the remodelling of an already existing propertyIberostar Hotels and Resorts entered the market of Ibiza in 2016 with a four-star hotel located in Santa Eulalia featuring 188 rooms.

    Recent and Forthcoming Tourism Developments

    • Ibiza’s most recent addition five-star supply is Nobu Hotel Ibiza Bay, a member of Nobu Hotels which opened on 30th June 2017 on Talamanca Bay. The hotel features 152 rooms and is operated by MC Hotels;
    • Sir Joan hotel, a five-star property located on Talamanca opened in June 2017 and features 38 rooms;
    • 7 Pines Resort, a five-star resort complex due to open in 2018. Located above Cala Conta Beach, in the southwestern part of the island, 7 Pines Resort Ibiza will offer a choice of three villas, 42 suites and 160 apartments, accommodating a maximum of 500 guests. Some of the holiday properties also offer private plunge pools and spacious terraces.
    • Cine Serra, a former cinema located in Ibiza city will open as a five-star hotel in 2018 featuring 50-60 rooms.
    • Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spas has announced the development of Six Senses Ibiza. Expected to open in 2020, the resort is located on the northern tip of Ibiza, Spain in the Cala Xarraca B. The resort will feature 134 rooms and nine private villas for sale located above the resort.

    It is rumored that several other high-end brands are looking for investment opportunities in Ibiza’s hotel market.

    High-end Hotels Performance

    Figure 7 summarises the important operating characteristics of a sample of high-end hotels in the broader region of Ibiza. The chart sets out the average occupancy, average room rate, and rooms revenue per available room (RevPAR) for a sample of 13 major upscale hotel properties representing in total 2,896 hotel rooms. For consistency reasons, despite the seasonal operation of the specific hotels all occupancy percentages refer to 365 days of operation.

    Performance of the selected hotels in Ibiza throughout the examined period is showcasing a constant improvement. During the last four years occupancy and average rate have witnessed a CAGR of 17% and 1% respectively leading to cumulative increase of the RevPAR by 19%. Occupancy levels have remained relatively stable throughout this period due to the seasonal limitations the area is confronting. At the same time, the island is witnessing an unprecedented growth which is clearly reflected in the performance of the average rate. By not being able to absorb the demand during the high season, hotel executives are constantly pushing for higher rates leading to the increase of the average rate for 2016 to over €400. Aggregated seasonal occupancy for 2016 was recorded at 79% for 183 operating days . Three top performers in the market reached occupancy levels between 78% and 82% and ADR between €500 and €650. Preliminary data indicate that this growth in the average rate is going to continue the upcoming season. The island’s continuous progress has also resulted in an increased appetite for hotel investments in the area which has led to the introduction of several high-end properties in the hotel market supply. Nonetheless, the region lacks a significant number of international hotel brands which could boost its upscale profile and recognition, thus leading to even higher levels of sales efficience and operating performance.

    In Focus: Ibiza, Spain | By Ezio Poinelli, Nana Boussia and Paolo Buffa di Perrero

    Conclusion

    Ibiza is a well-established destination with strong levels of occupancy and a high number of repeated guests, mainly in the summer months. Over the past years, the destination has managed to differentiate itself from its previous reputation as an island mainly offered for low-budget, party-centric holidays and is now considered as one of the most upscale destinations within Europe. Despite the highly-priced holidays that Ibiza offers, seasonal occupancy especially in the most famous parts of the island, reaches peak levels which leads to a very congested destination making it hard for tourists to move from one place to another. Due to the high levels of tourist demand, new international flights are announced on a yearly basis while the destination is in the process of penetrating new prosperous markets. UK is Ibiza’s main international source market and therefore generates the strongest demand. However the recent Brexit has created concern for the future of the specific market in the island and the impact it will have on the visitors’ travel patterns. With all the recent high-end tourism-related developments in the island, ranging from luxury meditation retreats on the north to music-themed sophisticated resorts in the south, we can easily justify why Ibiza is included in the prime leisure destinations in Europe. During the last decade lower category hotels have been either closing or reconverted to high-end properties. This, combined with the absence of branded properties and the efforts that are being made to overcome the seasonality issues, witnesses that Ibiza is yet to unfold its full potential as a leading destination.

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Ibiza’s best new restaurants and beach clubs – Evening Standard

From a farm to table concept to the hottest new beach clubs, here are some of Ibiza’s most recent restaurant openings…

El Portalon

Cook and writer Anne Sijmonsbergen is something of an organic food pioneer in Ibiza. Her farm on the island, Can Riero, supplies produce to many of the top restaurants and mainland Spain while her book Eivissa showcases the Ibicenco dishes Ibiza cuisine has to offer.

Fans and followers will be delighted to know she has opened a restaurant and it is as excellent as expected. 

El Portalon is a wonderful spot armed with a passionate, knowledgeable team who will give you the warmest of welcomes. Summer dining takes place in the courtyard, all trees and fairy lights. On arrival you will be presented with a blackboard with the day’s menu. Ingredients are locally sourced (many from Anne’s farm) and your waiter will be able to tell you the origins of every dish. There is a brilliant wine list to boot.

As the nights get chillier, you can enjoy the cosy indoors which is kitted out with vintage furniture and a laid-back chic style.

This is the place to try when visiting the Old Town, elportalonibiza.com.

Peyotito Ibiza

Peyotito, part of the modern Mexican restaurant Group with branches in Notting Hill and Mayfair, is making its mark on the White Isle with a new opening in Nobu Hotel Ibiza Bay. Set along the white sandy beaches of Talamanca Bay, it has amazing views of the Mediterranean Sea and a bespoke menu of delicious Mexican dishes with an influence of Spanish tradition and Ibizan ingredients.

A far cry from the typical Mexican ‘Tex-Mex’ cuisine, Peyotito offers contemporary and refined fare from Verde Vuelve a la Vida with Lubina (local Ibiza fish) to Papas with chorizo and chilli pasilia. The sharing concept sits against a backdrop of earthy, stylish interiors and an extensive cocktail list includes favourite mezcal concoctions such as the signature Peyotito Margarita, an ideal tipple for watching the sunset.

Dinner by the outdoor fire pit couldn’t be more romantic and the super friendly staff will ensure you have a fun and flavourful night, peyoterestaurant.com.

Aiyanna Ibiza

From the team behind the renowned Amante Ibiza, Aiyanna is the much anticipated sister restaurant in Cala Nova Bay. On the north side of Ibiza, it is in a beautiful setting with access to a lovely beach.  

The design concept makes use of natural materials with a wooden decked terrace and a space inspired by nature. There is a cool, rustic vibe complemented with splashes of colour.

The menu fuses Western Mediterranean food with East.

Mezze sharing platters, an array of vegetarian options as well as free-range fish and organic meat are all delicious.  

Many of the ingredients are grown in the restaurant’s very own garden.

A wonderfully boho lunch choice, aiyannaibiza.com.

Cala Bonita

This buzzing beach club, run by a group of friends, opened last season and has already gained quite the reputation. As popular with couples as large groups, it has a bright and breezy look with views over the sea.

The décor fuses pared back Scandinavian style with Mediterranean verve. Swaying bamboo lighting hangs over long wooden tables. There is a separate area for more casual dining or some nibbles which you can take to the beach.

Tuck into the fish of the day or one of the signature rice dishes and soak up the views over refreshing cocktails, calabonitaibiza.com.

Ibiza’s best new restaurants and beach clubs – Evening Standard

From a farm to table concept to the hottest new beach clubs, here are some of Ibiza’s most recent restaurant openings…

El Portalon

Cook and writer Anne Sijmonsbergen is something of an organic food pioneer in Ibiza. Her farm on the island, Can Riero, supplies produce to many of the top restaurants and mainland Spain while her book Eivissa showcases the Ibicenco dishes Ibiza cuisine has to offer.

Fans and followers will be delighted to know she has opened a restaurant and it is as excellent as expected. 

El Portalon is a wonderful spot armed with a passionate, knowledgeable team who will give you the warmest of welcomes. Summer dining takes place in the courtyard, all trees and fairy lights. On arrival you will be presented with a blackboard with the day’s menu. Ingredients are locally sourced (many from Anne’s farm) and your waiter will be able to tell you the origins of every dish. There is a brilliant wine list to boot.

As the nights get chillier, you can enjoy the cosy indoors which is kitted out with vintage furniture and a laid-back chic style.

This is the place to try when visiting the Old Town, elportalonibiza.com.

Peyotito Ibiza

Peyotito, part of the modern Mexican restaurant Group with branches in Notting Hill and Mayfair, is making its mark on the White Isle with a new opening in Nobu Hotel Ibiza Bay. Set along the white sandy beaches of Talamanca Bay, it has amazing views of the Mediterranean Sea and a bespoke menu of delicious Mexican dishes with an influence of Spanish tradition and Ibizan ingredients.

A far cry from the typical Mexican ‘Tex-Mex’ cuisine, Peyotito offers contemporary and refined fare from Verde Vuelve a la Vida with Lubina (local Ibiza fish) to Papas with chorizo and chilli pasilia. The sharing concept sits against a backdrop of earthy, stylish interiors and an extensive cocktail list includes favourite mezcal concoctions such as the signature Peyotito Margarita, an ideal tipple for watching the sunset.

Dinner by the outdoor fire pit couldn’t be more romantic and the super friendly staff will ensure you have a fun and flavourful night, peyoterestaurant.com.

Aiyanna Ibiza

From the team behind the renowned Amante Ibiza, Aiyanna is the much anticipated sister restaurant in Cala Nova Bay. On the north side of Ibiza, it is in a beautiful setting with access to a lovely beach.  

The design concept makes use of natural materials with a wooden decked terrace and a space inspired by nature. There is a cool, rustic vibe complemented with splashes of colour.

The menu fuses Western Mediterranean food with East.

Mezze sharing platters, an array of vegetarian options as well as free-range fish and organic meat are all delicious.  

Many of the ingredients are grown in the restaurant’s very own garden.

A wonderfully boho lunch choice, aiyannaibiza.com.

Cala Bonita

This buzzing beach club, run by a group of friends, opened last season and has already gained quite the reputation. As popular with couples as large groups, it has a bright and breezy look with views over the sea.

The décor fuses pared back Scandinavian style with Mediterranean verve. Swaying bamboo lighting hangs over long wooden tables. There is a separate area for more casual dining or some nibbles which you can take to the beach.

Tuck into the fish of the day or one of the signature rice dishes and soak up the views over refreshing cocktails, calabonitaibiza.com.

Ibiza’s best new restaurants and beach clubs – Evening Standard

From a farm to table concept to the hottest new beach clubs, here are some of Ibiza’s most recent restaurant openings…

El Portalon

Cook and writer Anne Sijmonsbergen is something of an organic food pioneer in Ibiza. Her farm on the island, Can Riero, supplies produce to many of the top restaurants and mainland Spain while her book Eivissa showcases the Ibicenco dishes Ibiza cuisine has to offer.

Fans and followers will be delighted to know she has opened a restaurant and it is as excellent as expected. 

El Portalon is a wonderful spot armed with a passionate, knowledgeable team who will give you the warmest of welcomes. Summer dining takes place in the courtyard, all trees and fairy lights. On arrival you will be presented with a blackboard with the day’s menu. Ingredients are locally sourced (many from Anne’s farm) and your waiter will be able to tell you the origins of every dish. There is a brilliant wine list to boot.

As the nights get chillier, you can enjoy the cosy indoors which is kitted out with vintage furniture and a laid-back chic style.

This is the place to try when visiting the Old Town, elportalonibiza.com.

Peyotito Ibiza

Peyotito, part of the modern Mexican restaurant Group with branches in Notting Hill and Mayfair, is making its mark on the White Isle with a new opening in Nobu Hotel Ibiza Bay. Set along the white sandy beaches of Talamanca Bay, it has amazing views of the Mediterranean Sea and a bespoke menu of delicious Mexican dishes with an influence of Spanish tradition and Ibizan ingredients.

A far cry from the typical Mexican ‘Tex-Mex’ cuisine, Peyotito offers contemporary and refined fare from Verde Vuelve a la Vida with Lubina (local Ibiza fish) to Papas with chorizo and chilli pasilia. The sharing concept sits against a backdrop of earthy, stylish interiors and an extensive cocktail list includes favourite mezcal concoctions such as the signature Peyotito Margarita, an ideal tipple for watching the sunset.

Dinner by the outdoor fire pit couldn’t be more romantic and the super friendly staff will ensure you have a fun and flavourful night, peyoterestaurant.com.

Aiyanna Ibiza

From the team behind the renowned Amante Ibiza, Aiyanna is the much anticipated sister restaurant in Cala Nova Bay. On the north side of Ibiza, it is in a beautiful setting with access to a lovely beach.  

The design concept makes use of natural materials with a wooden decked terrace and a space inspired by nature. There is a cool, rustic vibe complemented with splashes of colour.

The menu fuses Western Mediterranean food with East.

Mezze sharing platters, an array of vegetarian options as well as free-range fish and organic meat are all delicious.  

Many of the ingredients are grown in the restaurant’s very own garden.

A wonderfully boho lunch choice, aiyannaibiza.com.

Cala Bonita

This buzzing beach club, run by a group of friends, opened last season and has already gained quite the reputation. As popular with couples as large groups, it has a bright and breezy look with views over the sea.

The décor fuses pared back Scandinavian style with Mediterranean verve. Swaying bamboo lighting hangs over long wooden tables. There is a separate area for more casual dining or some nibbles which you can take to the beach.

Tuck into the fish of the day or one of the signature rice dishes and soak up the views over refreshing cocktails, calabonitaibiza.com.