Where to Relax (and What to Eat) in Formentera – New York Times

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This Platja de Migjorn beach shack is sleepy Formentera at its finest. There’s reggae on the stereo and just a few tables, all shaded by a palm-frond awning and army netting that flutters in the breeze. A tiny kitchen turns out hamburgers and chicken skewers, along with cold beers and punchy gin-and-lemon cocktails. Patrons, meanwhile, get a view of the ombré shallows (and the barely clad swimmers enjoying them). Platja de Migjorn, west of Gecko Hotel & Beach Club.

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The mise-en-place for Catalan lobster at 10.7.

Credit
Luis DÍaz DÍaz

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A staircase at 10.7.

Credit
Luis DÍaz DÍaz

10.7

A white rectangular box perched high above the striped umbrellas on the eastern end of Platja de Migjorn, this beach bar channels Ibiza-style glamour, with prices to match. The ceviche may not be fully authentic Spanish fare, but it’s perfectly citrusy and piquant, and pairs well with icy rosé. After a long lunch and a dip in the sea below, diners often return for sunset cocktails.

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Giorgio Armani’s former personal chef, the dashing Antonio D’Angelo, opened this trendy restaurant, which, with its artful amuse-bouches (e.g. octopus tempura with jalapeño mayo) and graphic, braided-rope furniture by Kettal, wouldn’t feel out of place in Manhattan. Standouts from the menu, which unites Italian and Japanese culinary techniques (D’Angelo is also the executive chef at Nobu Milan), include Wagyu beef wrapped in paper-thin ravioli with caramelized onions, and a succulent, charcoal-smoked bonito with artichoke that arrives billowing steam. Diners can sit ringside at the chef’s table, or choose a perch on the terrace and watch the yachts come and go.

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Decorative surfboards in El Pilar de la Mola.

Credit
Luis DÍaz DÍaz

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Sunbathers at Caló des Mort, in Formentera’s Migjorn area.

Credit
Luis DÍaz DÍaz

SHOP

Balafia

In an airy space in Sant Francesc Xavier, this 12-year-old boutique stocks elegant, vacation-friendly clothes, accessories and furniture. Parisian textile designer Annie Barbaret and fellow French émigré Pascale Morel source them from small designers all over Europe, as well as from fair-trade enterprises in Rwanda and Bangladesh. Along with embroidered cotton tunics by Corsican label Mare di Latte, you’ll find brightly patterned Wayuu bags, women’s and children’s swimsuits and woven hammam towels. 011-34-659-397-181.

Iemanya

Instead of the biweekly hippie market at El Pilar de la Mola, which lately offers more key chains and tourist T-shirts than artisanal crafts, visit this boutique in Sant Francesc Xavier. Run by Claudia Rossi Liacho, an Argentine woman who arrived in Formentera in the early 1980s, the shop is draped to the rafters with maximalist tribal cotton and silk textiles and accessories from Rajasthan, Gujarat and Uttar Pradesh, featuring floral block prints and needlepoint beasts and birds in vibrant pinks, greens and blues. It’s easy to lose hours happily rifling through the intricately embroidered and mirrored suzanis, camel blankets, caftans and colorful pompom bracelets. Avenida de Portossaler 13, Sant Francesc Xavier.


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